JSDC
Entry: Public Domain
Official= Official Comment

From Steve
Website: http://www.toicreative.com
The dichotomy of JSDC: a quote from Aesop's Fables and a quote from the Dixie Chicks.
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From Sean Stubblefield
I see no dichotomy. Both stories have a theme of individual freedom, and self-determination.
If God and Lucifer say the same thing, is it dichotomous?

"They forgot how to be cows... now they see sky, and they remember what they are."
--River Tam; Firefly

"You can't take the sky from me."
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Official Comment From Jessica
Nailed it.

Here's the "well said" quote, because it will change soon:

"Well, I fought with a stranger and I met myself / I opened my mouth and I heard myself / It can get pretty lonely when you show yourself / Guess I could have made it easier on myself / But no, I could never follow / I never seem to do it like anybody else" –Dixie Chicks

From Steve
Website: http://www.toicreative.com
I see what you mean. I believe the Dixie Chicks quote is about following your own path, and the Fable is about not being repressed however small the cost or great the reward. Of course there is an overlying theme, but that could be deduced by almost any comparison. I was speaking to the dual nature of the sources for site content. In finding meaning and relevancy both in ancient fables and modern pop culture. 'Does content's meaning, at least partly, draw from its source?' may be the more apt question and I believe that it does. Even if the fable and the quote spoke to the exact same thing, I would not consider them equally. If God and Satan told me the same thing I would consider it from two different perspectives.
I believe the problem is the use of the word dichotomy on my part. It suggests an exclusivity and contradiction that I did not intend. My bad…..*cough*
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From Sean Stubblefield
Steve, I wondered if that may be what you meant. In which case, good question; and I'll agree, to a point. JSDC IS diverse in its "source material". Content's connotation CAN be derived from its source, though not denotation. Content's meaning draws from its source only if we assume it does. But it is a mistake and danger to regard the messenger over the message. A person's reputation or status may lend an appearance of credibility to a statement, for a certain audience, but the statement's veracity does not depend on or originate with the person saying it. A thing is true because it is true, not because a particular person said it. Something is not good because God says so, but because it is good.
If Hitler told you that the sky is blue and water is wet, should you discount these because Hitler said it? Keep in mind the phrase, "don't kill the messenger." However, the context of a statement, its meaning, may be determined or interpreted according to its source-- to the degree that we trust and what we "understand" about the source. And perhaps how it is said. Returning to the theme, we have to be willing to think for ourselves and make our own determinations, allowing for a margin of error and subjectivity--ours and the source's-- in accepting something as true on faith JUST because we trust the source.
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